La Tortilleria Tortillas : A shameless (unpaid) plug

As a consumer I try to shop wisely. We don’t have a lot of money in our grocery budget but I also think it’s incredibly important to make ethical decisions and support local businesses. How food is produced matters more to me than how much it costs – and if it’s too expensive I’ll just buy it when it’s heavily discounted and put it in the deep freeze (I’m looking at you organic, grass fed and finished beef and lamb, ¬†organic chicken and sustainably caught fish!), purchase less of it or figure out how to make it myself.

When Mr Incredible was diagnosed as being allergic to wheat though, our grocery bill shot through the roof. So many things I’d done to save a penny here and there were negated with one diagnosis. Sure, we could continue to bake our own bread but a wheat free loaf costs both a lot to make and a lot to buy – especially if you care about taste, texture and ingredients. One of the biggest shocks I got was just how disgusting some of the ingredients that make up mainstream GF food are. I have a habit of reading labels and the amount of times I couldn’t bring myself to buy a GF item are without count… Mr Incredible just missed out ūüė¶

One of the items that’s been difficult for us is wraps. We really like burritos and my mince base usually does us for two meals – burritos one night and Mexican potatoes the next. (It’s here that I should also apologise to my North American readers – we do Mexican a lot less traditionally here most of the time and what I serve up as burritos might be unrecognisable to you!) Regardless, it’s one of those meals were we purchase two different types of wraps. Wheat based and freshly made for us – preservative laden for Mr Incredible who asked me to make an exception on the ingredient rule for this dinner. Which is why, when I came across a demonstration by La Tortillieria in our local grocer the other day I purchased three packs of their incredibly delicious, traditionally made wraps. We’ve gone from these ingredients:

  • Whole Ground Corn treated with lime (54%), Water, Preservative (282, 202), Food Acid (297), Thickener (412, 466), Enzyme (1100)

To these:

  • Corn &¬†Sea Salt

If you’re in Australia and looking for a better option, do yourself a favour and check them out. I do realise they’re probably rather easy to make yourself… but when you can buy them this good I have so much less incentive.

*This blog is unpaid and with no incentive other than hoping enough people buy the product so that it will stay on shelves and I can continue to.

Easy lunches: Gut Soothing Bone Broth with a whole chicken

Mr Incredible and I have been reading Dr Michael Moseley’s “The Clever Guts Diet” and finding some great ways to implement a better diet for our gut health (and reasons to do so). One of the best things about the book is really easy to follow recipes that are easy to do. One of them is the recipe for “Gut Soothing Bone Broth” – I’ve made bone broths before but using the carcass of a chicken and then cooking that overnight. What I LOVE about this recipe is that it basically poaches a whole chicken, which you then strip of its meat for when you want chicken throughout the week – salads, omelettes, sandwiches, a quick dinner etc. It’s perfect for our lifestyle and is a way we can waste less but use more.

We utilise organic chickens for this – but a note for those looking to save a penny or two, check when your supermarket’s organic chickens are going to expire and pop in the day before this happens – this is how we get our ethically sourced, organic meat at 30-70% off. I base my shopping around the discount routines of the grocers I go to and utilise my deep freezer to its full!¬†IMG_4965.JPG

Gut-soothing Bone Broth from Dr Michael Mosley’s The Clever Guts Diet

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium organic chicken
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 2 garlic cloves – crushed
  • 3 chopped carrots
  • 2 chopped celery sticks
  • 3 sliced zucchinis (or one big one!)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 tbsp of live (raw) apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2-3 slices of root ginger
  • 1 tsp of ground turmeric (or sliced fresh)
  • sea salt and black peppercorns

Method:

  1. Place all the ingredients in a large saucepan with just enough water to cover them. Bring the pan to the boil, then lower the heat, put the lid on and let it simmer, ideally for 6-8 hours but for at least 2-3 hours, topping up the liquid with water as required
  2. Take the chicken out and place it on a platter to cool. Remove all the meat from the carcass and place it in the fridge for use throughout the week.
  3. This broth will keep in the fridge for 3-4 days or can be frozen for up to 1 month. Aside from using in recipes, it can be sipped as a warm drink and works well with a squeeze of lemon and a little salt.

How we eat cheap meat that’s ethically produced

I’ve been very impacted by Philip Lymbery’s book Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat¬†and reading it cemented and refined my desire to be careful about what our family consumes when it comes to animal¬†products. On a limited budget though, eating only pasture fed, chemical free and sustainable produce can be difficult – for all types of food, meat, dairy or otherwise. It’s a challenge though that I relish in and finding produce we can afford that fits our mindset is one of the things I like about being a stay-at-home-mum and having more time on my hands to find the bargains. Most of the time when it comes to meat I’ll shop at the gourmet supermarkets and only buy something when it’s marked down due to soon reaching it’s use by date. Often I’ll be able to pick up incredible (mostly organic) products at 1/3 or 1/4 of the price – into the freezer they go! We hardly ever eat steak though and mostly feed on “secondary cuts” or mince largely supplemented by beans, legumes and vegetables. Belted Galloway Beef BoxFor a long time¬†I’ve been on Feather and Bone‘s mailing list, waiting for the time when available finances, freezer space and suitable product collide. A fortnight ago they did and today, on return from our Thank God it’s Friday Adventure, a courier was waiting to deliver our Ashrose Belted Galloway Beef Box. Dry aged for 4 weeks, pasture fed and chemical free, this sustainably raised beef would usually be way out of our budget. The beauty of shopping around though has meant that we can afford 10KG of this meat and feed off it for the next 3 months. What Mr Incredible is excited about is that we get steak!! The box was filled with both “prime” and “secondary” cuts that will make both of us happy, along with knowing where our meat has come from and how it’s been produced. In the future we’d like to buy direct from a¬†farmer for all our meat, and buy more of the whole animal, but until we can afford a deep freezer 10kg is our maximum purchase. Making intentional choices about what we consume can be hard to follow through with. When we manage to fulfil those intentions with actual buying decisions however, and can see consistent success with living a certain way, the satisfaction can be immense. That’s how it is with me at least, and I look forward to brining our steak to BBQs in the near future – just in time for summer! Why we buy pasture / grass fed animal products:

  1. It’s better for you. For both milk and meat, the research indicates that grass fed animals have a higher concentration of Omega 3 content and in meat, lower levels of saturated fats than grain fed cattle. http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/7905466 ¬†http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/15023647¬†http://www.pariscreekbeef.com.au/did_you_know02.php
  2. It’s better for the animal. There’s a lot of research on this one (and it’s also covered convincingly in Farmageddon) but it doesn’t take a lot of research to tell you what’s obvious to anyone observing the animals.
  3. It’s better for the environment.¬†As Feather and Bone write: “For these producers, whose holy grail is the achievement of a perfectly balanced, harmonious orchestra of soil, plants and animals in the patch over which they have custodianship, the name of their farm is shorthand for their entire approach to life. Because farming for the long term, without the habitual use of chemical fertilisers, pesticides, hormones, antibiotics and other artificial inputs, requires a level of acute observation, responsiveness and agility that many farmers either aren’t prepared to give or feel would compromise their short term productivity too seriously to be viable.” To read something directly from a farmer go to : http://www.blackwoodvalleybeef.com.au/index.php/our-philosophy
  4. It tastes better.

Research each of these points yourself though – there’s a lot of information on the www and differing views. At the end of the day we all need to make our own choices.